Hello Readers

Time for a follow-up to the Single Button Combination Lock by creating another oddball type of switch/lock. To activate this switch we make use of a Parallax Ping))) Ultrasonic sensor, an Arduino-style board and some other hardware – to make a device that receives a four-number code which is made up of the distance between a hand and the sensor. If Arduino and ultrasonic sensors are new to you, please read this tutorial before moving on.

The required hardware for this project is minimal and shown below – a Freetronics Arduino-compatible board, the Ping))) sensor, and for display purposes we have an I2C-interface LCD module:

The combination for our ‘lock’ will consist of four integers. Each integer is the distance measured between the sensor and the user’s hand (etc.). For example, a combination may be 20, 15, 20, 15. So for the switch to be activated the user must place their hand 20cm away, then 15, then 20, then 15cm away. Our switch will have a delay between each measurement which can be modified in the sketch.

To keep things simple the overlord of the switch must insert the PIN into the switch sketch. Therefore we need a way to take measurements to generate a PIN. We do this with the following sketch, it simply displays the distance on the LCD (download sketch). And here is a demonstration of the sketch in action: 

Now for the switch itself. For our example the process of “unlocking” will be started by the user placing their hand at a distance of 10cm or less in front of the sensor. Doing so will trigger the function checkPIN(), where the display prompts the user for four “numbers” which are returned by placing their hand a certain distance away from the sensor four times, with a delay between each reading which is set by the variable adel. The values of the user’s distances are stored in the array attempt[4].

Once the four readings have been taken, they are compared against the values in the array PIN[]. Some tolerance has been built into the checking process, where the value entered can vary +/- a certain distance. This tolerance distance is stored in the variable t in this function. Each of the user’s entries are compared and the tolerance taken into account. If each entry is successful, one is added to the variable accept. If all entries are correct, accept will equal four – at which point the sketch will either “unlock” or display “*** DENIED ***” on the LCD.

Again, this is an example and you can modify the display or checking procedure yourself. Moving forward, here is our lock sketch (download). Here is our final product housed in a nice enclosure:

And for the final demonstration of the switch in action. Note that the delays between actions have been added for visual effect – you can always change them to suit yourself: 

So there you have it – the base example for a different type of combination switch. I hope someone out there found this interesting or slightly useful :)

If you have any suggestions with regards to our next article, leave a comment below and we’ll look into it. Furthermore, don’t be shy in pointing out errors or places that could use improvement. Why not follow us on twitterGoogle+ and facebook to keep up with new articles, news and other items of interest. Article by John Boxall for Little Bird Electronics.